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DL
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xx Post-hatch Care and Nutrition
« Thread started on: Sep 29th, 2006, 1:13pm »

http://www.msstate.edu/dept/poultry/growchix.htm
Grow Healthy Chicks (MSState)

http://www.vetcareindia.com/p_bul_ecm.htm
Early Chick Mortality

http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/1287.htm
ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS TO CONTROL WHEN BROODING CHICKS
(I have excerpted the following info as there often seems to be questions round body temperatures and when/why temperature is so important etc.)
http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/1287.htm
"Research has shown that the chick develops the ability to regulate its body temperature around 12 to 14 days of age. The chick can be easily stressed if its body temperature decreases or increases by as much as one degree. Once the body temperature changes the bird will try to compensate and it most cases this means that it will have a negative effect on performance. The body temperature of a day-old chick is approximately 103 degrees F (39 degrees C), but by about five days of age body temperature is 106 degrees F (41.1 degrees C), the same as the adult. Extreme temperatures (high or low) often result in chick mortality, but even mild chilling or overheating can damage young chicks without causing death. While chicks are more tolerant of high temperatures than adult birds, high temperatures for extended periods of time increase mortality and have negative impact on performance.

Research has shown chicks that are subjected to cold temperature have impaired immune and digestive systems. As a result, cold stressed chicks have reduced growth and increased susceptibility to diseases. Cold stressed chicks will exhibit higher incidence of ascites, a metabolic disorder that results in reduced performance, increased mortality and increased condemnations at the processing plant. In research studies where groups of chicks were brooded at either 80 degrees F or 90 degrees F, the chicks reared under the warmer temperature had better weight gains, feed conversion and livability. Chicks brooded under 80 degrees F experienced reduced growth compared to the high brooding temperature treatment. The chicks reared under those temperatures did not catch up in body weight and as a result weighed less at market age than birds that were brooded properly. Not only do chicks exposed to low brooding temperatures have reduce growth rates, but they will consume more feed to keep themselves warm, reducing feed efficiency and increasing feed costs.

Temperature and Chick Environment
One of the goals during brooding is to maintain chicks within their comfort zone, which is where they are not using energy to gain or loose heat to maintain body temperature. When birds are kept in environmental temperatures above or below their comfort zone, more energy must be expended to maintain body temperature. This extra energy will ultimately be supplied by the feed consumed. Therefore, the energy from the feed will be used to maintain body temperature instead of growth and development resulting in poorer feed conversion...."

Table 1. Recommended Air Temperatures During Brooding for Broilers by Heat Source 1

Air Temperature

Day
Forced Air Furnace 2 ...Conventional Brooder 3 ......Radiant Brooder4

DAY 0
93 F (34 C)...............90 F (32 C)....................88 F (31 C)

DAY 3
90 F (32 C)...............88 F (31 C)....................86 F (30 C)

DAY 7
87 F (31 C)...............86 F (30 C)....................84 F (29 C)

DAY 14
83 F (28 C)...............85 F (29 C)....................82 F (28 C)

DAY 21
78 F (26 C)...............80 F (27 C)....................77 F (25 C)

http://compepid.tuskegee.edu/syllabi/pathobiology/pathology/avianmed/chapter6.html
NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCIES (recognize and treat)

http://www.thepoultrysite.com/articles/494/recognising-and-preventing-naval-yolk-sac-mortality
Recognizing and Preventing Navel Yolk-Sac Mortality

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/pdf/pnw/pnw478.pdf#search='draft%20vs.%20ventilation%20poultry'
Hatching Small Numbers of Eggs

http://www.novusint.com/Public/Library/TechPaper.asp?ID=72
The Nutritional Requirements of Hatchling Poultry

http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/livestocksystems/DI0631.html
HATCHING AND BROODING SMALL NUMBERS OF CHICKS

http://ferl.becta.org.uk/display.cfm?resID=4150
Hatching and Taking Care of Chicks (with videos)

http://www.gov.mb.ca/cgi-bin/print_hit_bold.pl/agriculture/livestock/poultry/bba01s37.html
BROODING AND REARING CHICKS (Manitoba AGri Article)

http://journeytoforever.org/farm_library/ppp/ppp10.html
ChapterX REARING CHICKS

http://www.wattnet.com/SHARED/DownLoad.cfm?libNum=1148
Post-hatch Nutrition

http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/vetext/INF-PO_BroilerCarePrax.pdf#search='Chicks%20poultry%20care'
Care of Broilers (University CA)



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