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DL
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xx AVIAN EMERGENCIES
« Thread started on: Oct 13th, 2006, 10:30am »

SEE ALSO various SPECIFIC PROCEDURES threads in WOUND MANAGEMENT:

http://dlhunicorn.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=practical
(WOUND MANAGEMENT thread)

http://dlhunicorn.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=toxicologydisease&action=display&num=1159339953
Toxic /poisoning emergencies

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/160702.htm
"Wound Lavage (flushing/cleaning)
Irrigation of the wound washes away both visible and microscopic debris. This reduces the bacterial load in the tissue, which helps decrease wound complications. Assuming the solution is nontoxic, the most important factor in wound lavage is use of large volumes to facilitate the removal of debris. The recommended lavage is a moderate pressure system using a 35-mL syringe and a 19-gauge needle that delivers lavage fluid at 8 lb/sq in. The use of antibiotics in the lavage fluid is controversial.
The ideal lavage fluid would be antiseptic and nontoxic to the healing tissues. Although isotonic saline is not antiseptic, it is the least toxic to healing tissue. Surgical scrub agents should not be used because the detergent component is damaging to tissue. Dilute antiseptics can be used safely. Chlorhexidine diacetate 0.05% has sustained residual activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria, while causing minimal tissue inflammation. However, gram-negative bacteria may become resistant to chlorhexidine. Stronger solutions of chlorhexidine are toxic to healing tissue. Povidone-iodine 1% is an effective antiseptic, but it has minimal residual activity and may be inactivated by purulent debris. "

http://www.exoticbird.com/macer.html
EXCELLENT advice on this short and concise summary on common avian emergencies

http://www.hagen.com/usa/birds/info_sheet.cfm?CAT=8&INFO=5
BLEEDING First Aid for Bleeding Emergencies

http://www.themodernapprentice.com/firstaid.htm
scroll down to BLEEDING (beak injuries etc.)

The following EXCELLENT article is not restrictive to the chicken but is equally applicable (remember this when certain medications are advised or a condition such as crop burn is addressed in the article which usually occurs with handfeeding crop technique )
http://drexotic.com/avian_emergencies.htm
covering:
Respiratory emergencies
Upper Airway Obstructions
Bleeding and Blood Loss
Anemia
Bite Wounds
Fractures
Burns / Shock / Poisonings

http://www.themodernapprentice.com/firstaid.htm
Most of the info contained herein on emergency and firstaid treatment is applicable for poultry.


http://www.avianmedicine.net/avmedpp/0040.htm
(excerpt):
..."a quick method for determining the volume of tube-feeding formula to administer to a bird:
Body weight 10 = ml/day # feedings/day = ml/feeding."
« Last Edit: Oct 26th, 2006, 04:37am by DL » User IP Logged

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