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DL
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xx Reproductive disorders (eggbound etc.)
« Thread started on: Dec 2nd, 2006, 9:06pm »

http://dlhunicorn.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=linksgeneralinfo&action=display&num=1158765194
REPRODUCTIVE DISEASE/links to articles on Egg-bound and Prolapse

THE FOLLOWING THREE VIDEOS ARE FROM AN EMERGENCY AVIAN FIRST AID CLASS GIVEN BY A VET SPECIFICALLY DEALING WITH EGGBINDING AND PROLAPSE (altho geared to cage birds and not chickens most of the principles and info is equally applicable)-DLsee this video (part one) for EGGBOUND:
http://www.5min.com/Video/How-to-treat-Egg-Binding-18782083

EGGBOUND video (class) part two:
http://www.5min.com/Video/How-to-treat-Egg-Binding-II-20017091

see this video (class) describing measures to take with PROLAPSE :
http://www.5min.com/Video/How-to-treat-Prolapse-26866091

http://www.acbaonline.com/pdf/ACBA%20Health%20Uterine%20Prolapse.pdf
(excerpt from non-avian tech paper however the same is advised in the avian specific literature as regarding use of sugar)
"...The uterus should be rinsed or soaked in warm water
or a warm, dilute antiseptic solution. Using a warm sugar solution can help decrease its size if the organ is extremely swollen. The uterine lining must be free of debris before reinsertion. The uterus must be examined for any damage such as tears and chewed or ‘dead’ areas. Only reinsert the uterus if it is clean and has no obvious damage. Torn or dead areas in the uterine wall will not heal by themselves and must be repaired by a veterinarian before reinsertion."

http://dlhunicorn.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=diseasecasestudies&action=display&num=1159696234

http://dlhunicorn.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=diseasecasestudies&action=display&num=1159913666

http://www.vin.com/VINDBPub/SearchPB/Proceedings/PR05000/PR00352.htm
Avian Specialist describes diverse treatment measures

http://www.avianweb.com/Prolapse.htm
PROLAPSED CLOACA (Avian Specialist describes the conditions and treatment measures in this excellent article)

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=15&cat=1835&articleid=2054
Vitamin A Deficiency (its possible role in reproductive disorder) EXCERPT:
"What are the other signs of hypovitaminosis A?
Symptoms range from obvious to obscure and include any of the following: sneezing, nasal discharge, wheezing, crusted and/or plugged nostrils, lethargy, depression, diarrhea, egg binding and dystocia, tail-bobbing, lack of appetite, emaciation (severe weight loss), poor feather color, swollen eyes, ocular discharge, gagging, foul-smelling breath, white patches or a "slimy" appearance to the mouth. Most of these imply your bird is very sick and needs immediate attention. These signs do not develop suddenly, but happen over the course of several weeks to months."

TEXT
« Last Edit: Sep 13th, 2008, 07:23am by DL » User IP Logged

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xx EGGBOUND / PROLAPSE
« Reply #1 on: Oct 17th, 2007, 05:58am »

http://www.bsava.com/VirtualContent/85340/psittacines_ch18.pdf
please read through the above excellent resource before taking action-DL

http://www.rcbctx.org/newsletter/February06.pdf
(excerpt)
"...EGG BINDING
The failure of an egg to pass through the oviduct at a
normal rate. Causes of egg binding include:
• Oviduct muscle dysfunction due to nutritional
deficiencies, especially calcium, vitamin E and
selenium
• Malformed eggs
• Excessive egg production which can exhaust the
birds reserves of calcium, vitamins and energy
• Previous reproductive tract damage or infection
which may lead to scarring and adhesions to other
organs
• Obesity which is unfortunately a very common
problem
• Lack of exercise, which leads to poor muscle
strength
• Senility. Older birds are more likely to become egg
bound
• Other stress factors, including severe temperature
changes, disease or overcrowding
Signs a bird can show include:
• Depression
• Reluctance to fly or perch
• Persistent tail wagging or straining
• A wide based stance (“penguin stance”)
• A hard swollen abdomen
• If severe, a leg weakness or paralysis.
Many of the complications of egg binding can lead
to the death of the bird. Treatment involves first and
foremost stabilizing the patient. Make no attempts at
delivering the egg until the bird is stable. If only minimal
depression is present then provide supplemental heat
(28-31°C) with easy access to food and water. Cropping
the bird with oral calcium, vitamin D and energy
supplements can be useful. Lubricate the vent (KY jelly
or Vaseline are useful). Wait at least 20 minutes for the
bird to pass her egg on her own before intervening.
If the hen stays stable but does not pass the egg then
a short attempt at gentle manipulation of the egg can
be attempted. Don’t press directly down onto the egg.
This will push the hard shell against the fragile kidneys,
adrenal glands and ovary, which can cause death or
bruising of the kidneys resulting in a leg paralysis.
Pressure can be applied to each side of the egg
downwards, towards the vent. If there is not immediate
success, stop. Put the bird back into the heat and wait
another 15 to 20 minutes.
This process can be repeated a number of times while the bird is not severely depressed. If still no success consider veterinary help....................
If the hen shows signs of severe depression then
immediate veterinary treatment is recommended.
We can provide the hen with antibiotics, intravenous
fluids, hormones (oxytocin) which promote uterine
contractions, steroids and injectable calcium and energy
supplements. If necessary we can collapse the egg after
draining its contents (ovocentesis) or open the uterus
under a general anaesthetic and remove the egg.....

PROLAPSE OF THE OVIDUCT AND UTERUS
An extrusion of the interior cloaca and uterus to the
exterior and has the appearance of a red inflamed mass of
soft tissue at the vent.
It can occur following normal egg laying but is especially
common after an episode of egg binding. It is more likely
to occur in birds that are in poor physical condition (e.g.
muscle weakness, obesity or malnutrition). More likely
with malformed, soft or shell-less eggs.
Treatment:
• Keep exposed tissues moist and clean with copious
amounts of saline solution or a very dilute iodine
(Betadine / PVP-Iodine) or chlorhexidine solution
(Aviclens or Hibiclens)
• If no egg is present and tissue is not badly
damaged then gently replace the prolapsed tissue
by pushing it back in place with a moistened swab
or cotton bud
• Can and often does recur, however if treated early
have a good chance at complete repair................"
« Last Edit: Oct 17th, 2007, 06:11am by DL » User IP Logged

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