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DL
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xx Miscellaneous
« Thread started on: Jun 27th, 2007, 04:57am »

http://ftp.sunet.se/wmirror/www.cipav.org.co/lrrd/lrrd17/4/pous17045.htm
CHOICE FEEDING -study

http://www.nwrc.usgs.gov/wdb/pub/wmh/wmh.pdf
WATERFOWL (some nice info here on nutritional values of forage feeds)
« Last Edit: Aug 1st, 2007, 09:11am by DL » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Miscellaneous/vit E research
« Reply #1 on: Aug 5th, 2007, 1:54pm »

Mol Reprod Dev. 2006 May 14; : 16700074 [Select][Unselect] [Hide][Unhide]
Antioxidant status of the lower oviduct in the chicken varies with age and dietary vitamin E supplementation.
[My paper] Christelle Breque , Peter Surai , Jean-Pierre Brillard
Protection of sperm membranes against lipid peroxidation is a pre-requisite to prolonged sperm storage, both in vivo and in vitro. As females from avian species can store spermatozoa in the utero-vaginal junction (UVJ) for prolonged periods, we investigated the mechanisms involved in antioxidative protection of the plasma membrane of chicken sperm in this region. Comparisons of concentrations in nonenzymatic (alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, and GSH) and enzymatic (GSH-Px, SOD) antioxidants among the vagina, UVJ and uterus of sexually mature chicken hens revealed tissue-specific profiles, with higher ascorbic acid content and increased GSH-Px and SOD activity in the UVJ compared to other regions of the lower oviduct (vagina, uterus). Deterioration of the antioxidant profile in the UVJ was observed in aging hens, but it was partially compensated by dietary supplementation with vitamin E (130 ppm). It is concluded that the chicken UVJ provides a complex defense barrier against lipid peroxidation of the sperm membrane during in vivo storage, which can be partially improved by dietary supplementation with vitamin E. The protective effects of this barrier decline over time during the reproductive season. Mol. Reprod. Dev. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Br Poult Sci. 2006 Jun ;47 (3):350-6 16787860 [Select][Unselect] [Hide][Unhide]
Vitamin E supplementation reduces dexamethasone-induced oxidative stress in chicken semen.
[My paper] Y Eid , T Ebeid , H Younis
1. We examined the effects of supplemental dietary vitamin E (Vit E) on semen quality and antioxidative status in male domestic fowls exposed to oxidative stress induced by synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (DEX) injection.2. Thirty-six Egyptian local cross males, 42 weeks old, were housed individually in cages in an open-sided building under 16 h light:8 h dark and were provided with commercial feed and water ad libitum. Birds were divided into 4 groups: DEX (4 mg/bird/d), Vit E (200 mg/kg diet), DEX + Vit E (4 mg/bird/d + 200 mg/kg diet, respectively) and control, n = 9. All treatments lasted for 7 continuous days.3. Oxidative stress induced by injection of DEX (4 mg/bird/d) resulted in decreased sperm count and motility correlated with an increased percentage of dead sperms. Vit E (200 mg/kg diet) enhanced sperm count and viability when supplemented to stress-induced birds, compared to DEX treatment alone.4. In seminal plasma, low calcium concentration, high lipid peroxidation and reduced activity of glutathione peroxidase were associated with the oxidative stress. Vit E reduced lipid peroxidation in the seminal plasma.5. In conclusion, excessive supplemental dietary Vit E improved semen quality when cockerels were subjected to stress conditions. It increased both sperm count and motility, reduced the percentage of dead sperm and enhanced the antioxidative status of seminal plasma.

Theriogenology. 2006 Mar 10; : 16530814 [Select][Unselect] [Hide][Unhide]
Effect of docosahexaenoic acid and alpha-tocopherol enrichment in chicken sperm on semen quality, sperm lipid composition and susceptibility to peroxidation.
[My paper] S Cerolini , L Zaniboni , A Maldjian , T Gliozzi
The aim of the present experiment was to study the effect of fish oil and Vitamin E rich diets on semen production, sperm functions and composition in broiler breeders. The following parameters were measured: semen volume and concentration, sperm motility and viability, sperm susceptibility to induced peroxidation, sperm lipid and alpha-tocopherol contents. Dietary n-3 PUFA were successfully transferred into spermatozoan phospholipid by fish oil feeding according to the following main features: (a) the C22:6n-3 and C22:5n-3 contents were increased, but C22:4n-6 remained the peculiar and major polyunsaturate; (b) the content and proportion of total PUFA did not change; (c) the proportional increase of n-3 PUFA was compensated by the decrease of n-6 PUFA, an increase in the proportion of n-9 fatty acids was also found. The sperm content of alpha-tocopherol was doubled increasing the dietary availability of the vitamin to 300mg/kg of feed. The specific n-3 PUFA and Vitamin E enrichment of chicken sperm affected cell functions. Significant interactions between the two treatments were also found for some parameters. The best sperm quality condition in control sperm (rich mainly in n-6 PUFA) was found supplying 200mg Vitamin E/kg of feed to the male breeders, and in contrast in n-3 rich sperm supplying 300mg Vitamin E/kg.



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xx vitE/selenium
« Reply #2 on: Nov 22nd, 2010, 08:46am »

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/100/7/797.full.pdf

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/100/7/797.full.pdf
excerpt:
"....it was demonstrated that the chick has a nutritional requirement for selenium even when adequate amounts of all other known nutrients, including vitamin E, are provided (4)....
The relationship of the role of selenium in vitamin E-supplemented animals to that in vitamin E-deficient animals has not yet been clarified. Although it is tempting to
assume that the two roles of selenium involve the same fundamental mechanism, the effect of vitamin E deficiency
must involve more than a quantitative increase in selenium requirement. The present and previous (4) investigations
from this laboratory demonstrate that an uncomplicated selenium deficiency in the chick does not result initially in exudative diathesis, which is typical in chicks deprived of both selenium and vitamin E.
.....An abnormality found consistently in selenium-deficient chicks is a fall in the blood level of vitamin E.
.......Experiments with radioactively-labeled vitamin E have shown that the low blood
levels of the vitamin were a consequenceof impaired absorption. The poor uptake of tocopherol was accompanied by abnormalities in fat absorption....Blood levels of vitamin E in
normal chicks vary with time and among individuals over a wide range, even when the content of the diet is kept constant.
Large differences also were observed in the uptake of labeled vitamin E from doses given per os. In general, however,
blood tocopherol levels were correlated with plasma turbidity.8 These observations suggest that vitamin E is normally absorbed as a constituent of lipid micelles,
and not by attachment to a specific protein, at least until arrival at the wall of mucosal cells, where ester forms are pre
sumably hydrolyzed (13). The concept that
lipid is a carrier for vitamin E is compatible with the results of absorption studies (14) and readily explains the low blood
tocopherol levels in celiac disease, cystic fibrosis, sprue, obstructive jaundice and diarrhea (15-18) as well as the changes noted here in the selenium-deficient chicks.
The abnormalities in fat digestion could be attributed to changes in the pan creas. Although the pancreas lesion fails
to account for many of the consequences of selenium deficiency, it is, nevertheless, clearly a primary effect of selenium deficiency in the chick. The changes in fat
digestion and vitamin E absorption occur before there is a marked effect on growth; thus if the pancreas lesion is responsible for these abnormalities, it also must pre
cede vitamin E deficiency and general debility.

The impaired fat absorption should affect the absorption of other lipid-soluble nutrients besides vitamin E, such as vita
min A, vitamin D, vitamin K and essential fatty acids. However, as the defect develops rapidly, tissue reserves of these factors eliminate the possibility of deficien
cies. Vitamin E, in contrast, has a rapid
turnover and furthermore, it is needed in large amounts by chicks on selenium-low diets for the prevention of exudative diathesis
.......
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