Board Logo
« Poo after egg peronitis and antibiotics . . . »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jan 21st, 2018, 03:05am



« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1  Notify Send Topic Print
 thread  Author  Topic: Poo after egg peronitis and antibiotics . . .  (Read 3076 times)
VChicChick
New Member
Image


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 1
xx Poo after egg peronitis and antibiotics . . .
« Thread started on: Oct 2nd, 2006, 3:11pm »

User Image
User Image

These are pictures of Matilda's poo this morning (2/10/2006)

Who: Matilda is a 2 1/2 year old large fowl Light Sussex hen.
Feed: Kept in a run, so limited amount of greens and bugs. Layers pellets availible ad-lib, as well as water, grit and crushed oyster shell. There is also a few blades of grass most days (10 or 15) and the occasional bit of grain.
Case history: In early August 06, Matilda had egg peronitis (an egg burst inside her). The symptoms were her being very lethargic, and having somthing that looked very much like beaten egg coming out of her backside (it had the consistency of egg too), which I thought was egg but the vet said was pus. The vet said that the only treatment was a course of antibiotics, which we gave her. This was Baytril 2.5% oral solution 1ml twice a day for a week. After this she seemed to get better.

On August 16th, a fox got in and killed her two companions, which left her on her own, causing considerable stress. On September 2nd, we got a new chicken to go in with her, but given at the time she was only 6-8 weeks old, she has not been able to join her but they can see each other through wire.

In mid-September, the symptoms returned again, particularly the egg/pus, but also to a lesser extent the lethargy. So, gave her another course of the same antibiotics. She recovered, but her poo has been like this ever since.

Long term prognosis: I have come to the conclusion that she has problems with absorbing calcium, which causes thin eggshells. I have come to this conclusion because the egg shells from her had been getting progressively thinner until the first bout of illness. So, I have given her crushed up Rennies, which are indigestion tablets made of pure calcium, disguised in some porridge (rolled oats and milk or water, but I use milk for the calcium and other goodies), warmed up, which goes down a treat on a cold winter morning smiley It has been suggested that I use a treatment for parrots which are chronic egg layers, which would stop her from laying ever again. I think this may be a good option as every times she attempts to lay an egg, it endangers her life and this will probably be a condition that she has for the rest of her life.
User IP Logged

Helena
DL
Administrator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM


Posts: 868
xx Re: Poo after egg peronitis and antibiotics . . .
« Reply #1 on: Oct 3rd, 2006, 07:46am »

Thanks for that contribution VChic!!!
User IP Logged

caralouise1974
New Member
Image


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 3
xx Re: Poo after egg peronitis and antibiotics . . .
« Reply #2 on: May 2nd, 2009, 06:43am »

on Oct 2nd, 2006, 3:11pm, VChicChick wrote:
It has been suggested that I use a treatment for parrots which are chronic egg layers, which would stop her from laying ever again. I think this may be a good option as every times she attempts to lay an egg, it endangers her life and this will probably be a condition that she has for the rest of her life.


What treatment, if you don't mind me prying, has been suggested for Matilda? I have a hen with terrible chronic laying problems and I'm having great difficulty convincing my vet that hysterectomy or Lupron hormone therapy are both possible solutions. He seems clueless but at the samke time determined not to go down either of these routes.
User IP Logged

DL
Administrator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM


Posts: 868
xx Re: Poo after egg peronitis and antibiotics . . .
« Reply #3 on: May 3rd, 2009, 6:29pm »

When you say "chronic egglaying problems" do you mean the bird becoming eggbound? (if so then I strongly suggest the "hysterectemy" > see the section here on "Case Studies" > Pennys surgery and print that out for your vet > if your vet is not familiar with the procedure (an avian specialist is recquired) then you need to go to a different vet)
If NOT , please post more info on the problem so I can direct you to the appropriate articles which may help figure out the problem.
Diana
User IP Logged

caralouise1974
New Member
Image


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 3
xx Re: Poo after egg peronitis and antibiotics . . .
« Reply #4 on: May 4th, 2009, 05:07am »

Sorry DL, I think I'm being a bit dumb - I can't find Penny's case study anywhere. Have looked in all the 'Case Studies' sections, but no joy.

Can you help me find it? Doh!
User IP Logged

caralouise1974
New Member
Image


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 3
xx Re: Poo after egg peronitis and antibiotics . . .
« Reply #5 on: May 4th, 2009, 12:21pm »

Sorry DL I didn't give you the extra details about Bella's condition did I?

You may possibly have been following my posts on Backyard Chickens forum but basically the problem seems to be phenomenal overproduction (I have known her lay four eggs in one day before!) which has led to soft shelled eggs, egg binding, eggs breaking inside her, and general distress (for both her and us) on a pretty much daily basis since she came into lay in February.

She's on a limited diet of quality layer's pellets, no treats, apart from a cherry tomato once a day which we use to hide the prescribed calcium supplements from the vet, and a handful of sunflower seeds in the evenings to help her body to cope with all this egglaying.

It's like nothing else I can possibly identify, and our vet is at a loss too. It's been suggested that she has a condition called chronic egglaying, which is common in lovebirds and parakeets, but rather rare in chickens, and that we need to firstly force a moult to stop her laying (which our vet is currently doing for us) and then treat her so that she won't start up again. This is apparently achieved by use of the hormone Lupron, or by hysterectomy.

Our vet is not keen on going down either of the these routes, once the forced moult is over, but doesn't otherwise seem to have a clue! He believes that removal of the reproductive organs of a chicken is a 'mutilation' and contrary to the ethical responsibilities stated by the Royal College!

I need a second opinion!
User IP Logged

Pages: 1  Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

WorldLingo Translator Email DL

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls